USS Arizona [1941]

Picture of dramatic sinking of USS ARIZONA, with the loss of 1,177 lives, during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, the event that brought about U.S. involvement in World War II. The picture is taken looking from the side of the USS Arizona. To the left you can Number Two 14″/45 triple gun turret pointing forward. The supporting structure for the gun director tripod has collapsed and the tripod is tilting forward towards the front of the ship giving the wreck its distinctive appearance.

At 08:06 a bomb from a Hiryu Kate hit between and to starboard of Turrets #1 & 2. The subsequent explosion which destroyed the forward part of Arizona was due to the detonation of the ammunition magazine, located in an armored section under the deck. Most experts seem to agree that the bomb could hardly have pierced the armor. Instead, it seems widely accepted that the black powder magazine (used for aircraft catapults) detonated first, igniting the smokeless powder magazine (used for the ship’s main armament).

More on Wikipedia.

USS Arizona [1941]

Photographer: unknown
Source: Naval archives

Omaha Beach, Normandy, France [1944]

Another famous photograph from Robert Capa. This one was taken on June 6, 1944 (D-Day), on the first assault wave on Omaha Beach. Capa took 108 pictures in the first couple of hours of the invasion. However, a staff member at Life made a mistake in the darkroom; he set the dryer too high and melted the emulsion in the negatives. Only eight frames in total were recovered.

Omaha Beach, Normandy, France [1944]

Photographer: Robert Capa
Source: wikipedia.org

Nagasaki [1945]

A first for the general public, the picture of the “mushroom cloud”? is a very accurate approximation of the enormous quantity of energy spread below. The first atomic bomb, released on August 6 in Hiroshima(Japan) killed about 80,000 people, but it didn’t seem enough because the Japanese didn’t surrender right away. Therefore, on August 9 another bomb was released above Nagasaki. The effects of the second bomb were even more devastating – 150,000 people were killed or injured. But the powerful wind, the extremely high temperature and radiation caused enormous long term damage.

Nagasaki [1945]
Photographer: U.S. Air Force
Source: japaneselifestyle.com.au