Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse [2004]

Part of a “photo session” from a Iraq Prison controlled by US, this is a picture showing the abuse on the prisoners held and interrogated there. The man standing on a box with wires connected to his body is Satar Jabar.

Taguba Report a criminal investigation by the US Army Criminal Investigation Command had already been underway since 2003 where multiple recruits from the 320th MP Battalion had been charged under the Uniform Code of Military Justice with prisoner abuse. In 2004 articles of the abuse,included pictures showing military personnel in abusing prisoners, came to public attention, when a 60 Minutes II news report (April 28) and an article by Seymour M. Hersh in The New Yorker magazine (posted online on April 30 and published days later in the May 10 issue) reported the story. Janis Karpinski, the commander of Abu Ghraib demoted for her lack of insight regarding the abuse, estimated later that 90% of detainees in the prison were innocent.

One officer and some enlisted men ad women were convicted.

Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse [2004]

Photographer: unknown U.S. military or Department of Defense employee
Source: wikipedia.org

Promontory Point [1869]

The place is notable as the location where the United States first Transcontinental Railroad was completed on May 10, 1869, with the driving of the Golden Spike, joining the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railroads. Promontory was the site of a temporary city during and shortly after the construction of the railroad, but this was then dismantled, and since then Promontory has had no permanent population. Since 1957 it has been preserved as part of the Golden Spike National Historic Site.

The work on the railway had been brutal. At one stage, efforts to tunnel through the marble spine of a Sierra Nevada mountain consumed an entire year, as only eight inches a day of progress was possible.

Promontory Point [1869]

Photographer: Charles Phelps Cushing
Source: wikipedia