Ground zero spirit [2001]

Thomas E. Franklin (born 1966) is an American photographer for The Bergen Record, best known for his photograph Raising the Flag at Ground Zero, which depicts firefighters raising the American flag at the World Trade Center after the September 11, 2001 attacks.

The flag-rasing photo was made shortly after 5 p.m on September 11, 2001. He was standing under a pedestrian walkway across the West Side Highway, which connected the World Trade Center to the World Financial Center at the northwest corner. Franklin said the firefighters were about 150 feet away from him and about 20 feet (6 meters) off the ground, while the debris was about 90 feet beyond that.

Ground zero spirit [2001]

Photographer: Thomas E. Franklin
Source: wikipedia.org

Ground Zero Spirit [2001]

One of the most famous pictures from 9/11, photo of three firemen raising the American flag at the site of the World Trade Center attacks. Shot by Thomas E. Franklin, of The Bergen Record, the photo first appeared on Sept 12, 2001 under the title, Ground Zero Spirit. The paper also put it on the Associated Press wire and it appeared on the covers of several newspapers around the world. The photo was a finalist in 2002 for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news photography.

Ground Zero Spirit [2001]

Photographer: Thomas E. Franklin
Source: arlingtoncemetery.net

Oklahoma City Bombing [1995]

The image of firefighter Chris Fields holding the dying infant Baylee Almon won the Pulitzer Prize for Spot News Photography in 1996.Two people, Lester LaRue and Charles Porter, standing just three feet apart took almost the same image yet it was Charles Porter’s image that won the Pulitzer.

At 9:02, on April 19, 1995, Gulf War vet, Timothy McVeigh detonated 4,800 lbs of fertilizer and fuel oil. The resulting blast destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal government Building and killed 168 people. The bombing, largest act of domestic terrorism, in America, shattered pre-911 America’s innocence.

As the fires raged rescue services and bystanders rushed to pull victims out of the twisted wreckage. Sifting through the rubble police officer, Sgt. John Avera found a small half buried body. Shouting. “I have a critical infant! I have a critical infant!” he thrust the, 1-year-old Baylee Almon into the arms of nearby firefighter Oklahoma City fire Capt. Chris Fields.

Oklahoma City Bombing [1995]

Photographer: Charles Porter
Source: oklahomacitybombing.com