The plight of Kosovo refugees [1999]

The photo is part of The Washington Post’s Pulitzer Prize-winning entry (2000) showing how a Kosovar refugee Agim Shala, 2, is passed through a barbed wire fence into the hands of grandparents at a camp run by United Arab Emirates in Kukes, Albania. The members of the Shala family were reunited here after fleeing the conflict in Kosovo.

The plight of Kosovo refugees [1999]

Photographer: Carol Guzy
Source: washingtonpost.com

Omaha Beach, Normandy, France [1944]

Another famous photograph from Robert Capa. This one was taken on June 6, 1944 (D-Day), on the first assault wave on Omaha Beach. Capa took 108 pictures in the first couple of hours of the invasion. However, a staff member at Life made a mistake in the darkroom; he set the dryer too high and melted the emulsion in the negatives. Only eight frames in total were recovered.

Omaha Beach, Normandy, France [1944]

Photographer: Robert Capa
Source: wikipedia.org

Face off during the Oka Crisis [1990]

This is probably Canada’s most famous picture. The Oka Crisis was a land dispute between the Mohawk nation and the town of Oka, Quebec which began on March 11 1990, and lasted until September 26 1990. It resulted in three deaths, and would be the first of a number of violent conflicts between Indigenous people and the Canadian Government in the late 20th century.

Face off during the Oka Crisis [1990]

Photographer: Shaney Komulainen
Source: wikipedia.org

Death of a Loyalist Soldier [1936]

From 1936 to 1939 Robert Capa photographed the horrors the Spanish Civil War. In 1936, he became known across the globe for a photo he took on the Cordoba Front of a Loyalist Militiaman who had just been shot and was in the act of falling to his death. Because of his proximity to the victim and the timing of the capture, there was a long controversy about the authenticity of this photograph. Historians eventually succeeded in identifying the dead soldier as Federico Borrell García and proved it authentic. This is the best-known picture of the Spanish civil war.

Death of a Loyalist Soldier [1936]

Photographer: Robert Capa
Source: answers.com

Larger then life [2004]

Picture taken in February 2004 on assignment for National Geographic, this photograph shows a unique aerial perspective of The Empty Quarter, the world’s largest sand desert. Photographer George Steinmetz took the picture while piloting his motorized paraglider in a remote part of Oman.

Since it first appeared in National Geographic, it has been included in numerous additional publications and exhibitions.

Larger then life [2004]

Photographer: George Steinmetz
Source: nationalgeographic.com

Conrad Schumann [1961]

East German border guard Conrad Schumann leaps into the French Sector of West Berlin over barbed wire on August 15, 1961.

Born in Leutewitz near Riesa, Schumann served as a soldier in the East German Bereitschaftspolizei. After three months’ training in Dresden, he was posted to a non-commissioned officers’ college in Potsdam, after which he volunteered for service in Berlin.

On 15 August 1961 he found himself, aged 19, guarding the Berlin Wall, then in its third day of construction, at the corner of Ruppinerstraße and Bernauerstraße. At that stage of construction, the Berlin Wall was only a low barbed wire fence. As the people on the Western side shouted Komm rüber! (“come over”), Schumann jumped the barbed wire and was driven away at high speeds by a waiting West Berlin police car. Photographer Peter Leibing captured a photograph of his escape on film and it became a well-known image of the Cold War.

Conrad Schumann [1961]

Photographer: Peter Leibing
Source: wikipedia

Abbey Road [1969]

Picture of cover of The Beatles album, Abbey Road, showing John, Ringo, Paul and George crossing the street. The view really is Abbey Road, London, NW8 looking north. The gates of the Abbey Road Studios are behind the white VW Beetle on the left, which, according to some proponents of the “Paul Is Dead” conspiracy theory, was parked there intentionally as a rebus.

Abbey Road [1969]

Photographer: Ian MacMillan (thanx Marino)
Source: beatles.com

Assassination of Japan Socialist Inejiro Asanuma [1960]

This picture was taken only a second before the japanese socialist Party leader Asanuma was assassinated by an right wing student. Photographer Yasushi Nagao said he was only on the right place and on the right time. He received a Pulitzer price for this photo.

Assassination of Japan Socialist Inejiro Asanuma [1960]

Photographer: Yasushi Nagao
Source: artnet.com

UPDATE: video footage of the assassination:

Sudan Famine UN food camp [1994]

The photo is the “Pulitzer Prize” winning photo taken in 1994 during the Sudan Famine.
The picture depicts stricken child crawling towards an United Nations food camp, located a kilometer away.

The vulture is waiting for the child to die so that it can eat him. This picture shocked the whole world. No one knows what happened to the child, including the photographer Kevin Carter who
left the place as soon as the photograph was taken.

Three months later he committed suicide due to depression.

Stricken child crawling towards a food camp

Photographer: Kevin Carter
Source: Wikipedia.org

Burning Monk – The Self-Immolation [1963]

June 11, 1963, Thich Quang Duc, a Buddhist monk from Vietnam, burned himself to death at a busy intersection in downtown Saigon to bring attention to the repressive policies of the Catholic Diem regime that controlled the South Vietnamese government at the time. Buddhist monks asked the regime to lift its ban on flying the traditional Buddhist flag, to grant Buddhism the same rights as Catholicism, to stop detaining Buddhists and to give Buddhist monks and nuns the right to practice and spread their religion.

While burning Thich Quang Duc never moved a muscle.

Burning Monk - The Self-Immolation [1963]

Photographer: Malcolm Browne
Source: wikipedia.org