The plight of Kosovo refugees [1999]

The photo is part of The Washington Post’s Pulitzer Prize-winning entry (2000) showing how a Kosovar refugee Agim Shala, 2, is passed through a barbed wire fence into the hands of grandparents at a camp run by United Arab Emirates in Kukes, Albania. The members of the Shala family were reunited here after fleeing the conflict in Kosovo.

The plight of Kosovo refugees [1999]

Photographer: Carol Guzy
Source: washingtonpost.com

Omaha Beach, Normandy, France [1944]

Another famous photograph from Robert Capa. This one was taken on June 6, 1944 (D-Day), on the first assault wave on Omaha Beach. Capa took 108 pictures in the first couple of hours of the invasion. However, a staff member at Life made a mistake in the darkroom; he set the dryer too high and melted the emulsion in the negatives. Only eight frames in total were recovered.

Omaha Beach, Normandy, France [1944]

Photographer: Robert Capa
Source: wikipedia.org

Face off during the Oka Crisis [1990]

This is probably Canada’s most famous picture. The Oka Crisis was a land dispute between the Mohawk nation and the town of Oka, Quebec which began on March 11 1990, and lasted until September 26 1990. It resulted in three deaths, and would be the first of a number of violent conflicts between Indigenous people and the Canadian Government in the late 20th century.

Face off during the Oka Crisis [1990]

Photographer: Shaney Komulainen
Source: wikipedia.org

Afghan Girl [1984]

And of course the afghan girl, picture shot by National Geographic photographer Steve McCurry. Sharbat Gula was one of the students in an informal school within the refugee camp; McCurry, rarely given the opportunity to photograph Afghan women, seized the opportunity and captured her image. She was approximately 12 years old at the time. She made it on the cover of National Geographic next year, and her identity was discovered in 1992.

Afghan Girl [1984]

Photographer: Steve McCurry
Source: nationalgeographic.com